read

Définition, traduction, prononciation, anagramme et synonyme sur le dictionnaire libre Wiktionnaire.
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Voir aussi Voir aussi : Read

Anglais[modifier | modifier le wikitexte]

Étymologie[modifier | modifier le wikitexte]

Étymologie manquante ou incomplète. Si vous la connaissez, vous pouvez l’ajouter en cliquant ici.

Nom commun[modifier | modifier le wikitexte]

Singulier Pluriel
read
/ɹiːd/
reads
/ɹiːdz/

read /ɹiːd/

  1. Lecture.
    • This book is a good read.
      Ce livre constitue une bonne lecture.

Verbe[modifier | modifier le wikitexte]

Temps Forme
Infinitif to read
/ɹiːd/
Présent simple,
3e pers. sing.
reads
/ɹiːdz/
Prétérit read
/ɹɛd/
Participe passé read
/ɹɛd/
Participe présent reading
/ˈɹiː.dɪŋ/
voir conjugaison anglaise

to read /ɹiːd/ transitif et intransitif, irrégulier

  1. Lire.

Prononciation[modifier | modifier le wikitexte]

Nom commun ou verbe (présent)

verbe (passé)

Homophones[modifier | modifier le wikitexte]

/ɹiːd/ :
/ɹɛd/ :

Paronymes[modifier | modifier le wikitexte]

Anagrammes[modifier | modifier le wikitexte]

Frison[modifier | modifier le wikitexte]

Étymologie[modifier | modifier le wikitexte]

Étymologie manquante ou incomplète. Si vous la connaissez, vous pouvez l’ajouter en cliquant ici.

Adjectif[modifier | modifier le wikitexte]

read /Prononciation ?/

  1. Rouge.
See also: Read

English

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology

From Middle English reden, from Old English rǣdan (to counsel, advise, consult; interpret, read), from Proto-Germanic *rēdaną (advise, counsel). Cognate with Scots rede, red (to advise, counsel, decipher, read), Saterland Frisian räide (to advise, counsel), West Frisian riede (to advise, counsel), Dutch raden (to advise, counsel, rede), German raten (to advise; guess), Danish råde (to advise), Swedish råda (to advise, counsel). The development from ‘advise, interpret’ to ‘interpret letters, read’ is unique to English. Compare rede.

Pronunciation

Noun, and verb's present tense
Verb's past tense and past participle

Verb

read (third-person singular simple present reads, present participle reading, simple past read, past participle read or (archaic, dialectal) readen)

A painting of a girl reading.
  1. (obsolete) To think, believe; to consider (that).
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.i:
      But now, faire Ladie, comfort to you make, / And read [] / That short reuenge the man may ouertake […].
  2. (transitive or intransitive) To look at and interpret letters or other information that is written.
    have you read this book?;  he doesn’t like to read
  3. (transitive or intransitive) To speak aloud words or other information that is written. Often construed with a to phrase or an indirect object.
    He read us a passage from his new book.
    All right, class, who wants to read next?
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, The Celebrity:
      In the old days, to my commonplace and unobserving mind, he gave no evidences of genius whatsoever. He never read me any of his manuscripts, […], and therefore my lack of detection of his promise may in some degree be pardoned.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 1, A Cuckoo in the Nest[1]:
      He read the letter aloud. Sophia listened with the studied air of one for whom, even in these days, a title possessed some surreptitious allurement. […]
  4. (transitive) To interpret or infer a meaning, significance, thought, intention, etc.
    She read my mind and promptly rose to get me a glass of water.
    I can read his feelings in his face.
  5. To consist of certain text.
    On the door hung a sign that read "No admittance".
    The passage reads differently in the earlier manuscripts.
  6. (intransitive) Of text, etc., to be interpreted or read in a particular way.
    Arabic reads right to left.
    That sentence reads strangely.
  7. (transitive) To substitute (a corrected piece of text in place of an erroneous one); used to introduce an emendation of a text.
    • 1832, John Lemprière et al., Bibliotheca classica, Seventh Edition, W. E. Dean, page 263:
      In Livy, it is nearly certain that for Pylleon we should read Pteleon, as this place is mentioned in connection with Antron.
  8. (informal, usually ironic) Used after a euphemism to introduce the intended, more blunt meaning of a term.
    • 2009, Suzee Vlk et al., The GRE Test for Dummies, Sixth Edition, Wiley Publishing, ISBN 978-0-470-00919-2, page 191:
      Eliminate illogical (read: stupid) answer choices.
  9. (transitive, telecommunications) To be able to hear what another person is saying over a radio connection.
    Do you read me?
  10. (transitive, UK) To make a special study of, as by perusing textbooks.
    I am reading theology at university.
  11. (computing, transitive) To fetch data from (a storage medium, etc.).
    to read a hard disk; to read a port; to read the keyboard
  12. (obsolete) To advise; to counsel. See rede.
    • William Tyndale
      Therefore, I read thee, get to God's word, and thereby try all doctrine.
  13. (obsolete) To tell; to declare; to recite.
  14. (transitive, transgenderism) To recognise (someone) as being transgender.
    Every time I go outside, I worry that someone will read me.
  15. simple past tense and past participle of read

Usage notes

  • When "read" is used transitively with an author's name as the object, it generally means "to look at writing(s) by (the specified person)" (rather than "to recognise (the specified person) as transgender"). Example: "I am going to read Milton before I read His Dark Materials, so I know what His Dark Materials is responding to."

Synonyms

Antonyms

  • (to be recognised as transgender): pass

Derived terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun

read (plural reads)

  1. A reading or an act of reading, especially an actor's part of a play.
    • Furnivall
      One newswoman here lets magazines for a penny a read.
    • Philip Larkin, Self's the Man
      And when he finishes supper / Planning to have a read at the evening paper / It's Put a screw in this wall — / He has no time at all []
    • 2006, MySQL administrator's guide and language reference (page 393)
      In other words, the system can do 1200 reads per second with no writes, the average write is twice as slow as the average read, and the relationship is linear.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

Look at pages starting with read.

Statistics

Anagrams


Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *raudaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rowdʰós < *h₁rewdʰ-.

Germanic cognates: Old Frisian rād (West Frisian read), Old Saxon rōd (Low German root, rod), Dutch rood, Old High German rōt (German rot), Old Norse rauðr (Danish rød, Swedish röd, Icelandic rauður), Gothic 𐍂𐌰𐌿𐌸𐍃 (rauþs).

Indo-European cognates: Ancient Greek ἐρυθρός (eruthrós), Latin ruber, Old Irish rúad, Lithuanian raũdas, Russian рудой (rudoj).

Pronunciation

Adjective

rēad

  1. red

Declension

Weak Strong
singular plural singular plural
m n f m n f m n f
nominative rēada rēade rēade rēadan nom. rēad rēade rēad rēada, -e
accusative rēadan rēade rēadan acc. rēadne rēad rēade rēade rēad rēada, -e
genitive rēadan rēadra, rēadena gen. rēades rēades rēadre rēadra
dative rēadan rēadum dat. rēadum rēadum rēadre rēadum
instrumental rēade


Descendants

  • Middle English: red

Swedish

Verb

read

  1. past participle of rea.

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian rād, from Proto-Germanic *raudaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rowdʰós < *h₁rewdʰ-. Compare English red, Low German root, rod, Dutch rood, German rot, Danish rød.

Adjective

read

  1. red