fomite

Définition, traduction, prononciation, anagramme et synonyme sur le dictionnaire libre Wiktionnaire.
Sauter à la navigation Sauter à la recherche
Voir aussi : Fomite, fómite

Français[modifier le wikicode]

Étymologie[modifier le wikicode]

(Date à préciser) Du latin fomes, fomitis (« amadou, ce qui enflamme, qui provoque une inflammation »).

Nom commun [modifier le wikicode]

Singulier Pluriel
fomite fomites
\fɔ.mit\

fomite \fɔ.mit\ masculin

  1. (Rare) (Médecine) Objet inerte pouvant être vecteur d’agents infectieux (bactéries, virus, parasites).
    • fomite : Tout(e) objet inanimé ou substance capable de transporter des organismes infectieux (germes, parasites, etc.) et donc de les transférer d’un individu à un autre. — (Comité d’experts sur le virus de la grippe et l’équipement de protection respiratoire individuelle, La Transmission du virus de la grippe et la contribution de l’équipement de protection respiratoire individuelle — Évaluation des données disponibles, Conseil des académies canadiennes, Ottawa, 2007)

Traductions[modifier le wikicode]

Anglais[modifier le wikicode]

Étymologie[modifier le wikicode]

(Date à préciser) Du latin fomes, fomitis (« amadou, ce qui enflamme, qui provoque une inflammation »).

Nom commun [modifier le wikicode]

Singulier Pluriel
fomite
\ˈfəʊˌmaɪt\
fomites
\ˈfəʊˌmaɪts\

fomite \ˈfəʊˌmaɪt\

  1. (Médecine) Objet inerte pouvant être vecteur d’agents infectieux (bactéries, virus, parasites).
    • 20. Thomas M. England, private, Hospital Corps, was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, and served in the Army from January 6, 1899, to January 5, 1914, in the grades of private, acting hospital steward, and sergeant, first class, Hospital Corps. […] He volunteered and underwent the fomites experiment, sleeping 20 nights in infected bedding, for which experiment he received a donation of $100 from the Cuban funds allotted by General Wood for these experiments. — (Honor Memory of Heroes of Fight Against Yellow Fever, in Congressional Edition House Reports, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1930, pages 8–9)
    • Alternatively, such fluids may be transferred from soiled hands to fomites, or airborne organisms may impinge or settle onto fomite surfaces. Fomites may also serve as a site for the replication of a pathogen, as in the case of enteric bacteria in household sponges or dishcloths. — (Raina M. Maier, Ian L. Pepper, Charles P. Gerba, Environmental Microbiology, 2009, page 559)
    • Fomites play a significant role in the transmission of infectious agents. The list of fomites is seemingly endless and includes objects in common use […] Toys are fomites and contribute to illness in children wherever the toys are shared. — (Robert I. Krasner, The Microbial Challenge: Science, Disease and Public Health, 2009, page 166)

Italien[modifier le wikicode]

Étymologie[modifier le wikicode]

(Date à préciser) Du latin fomes, fomitis (« amadou, ce qui enflamme »).

Nom commun [modifier le wikicode]

fomite \Prononciation ?\ masculin (pluriel à préciser)

  1. Incitation.
  2. Cause, source.

Latin[modifier le wikicode]

Forme de nom commun [modifier le wikicode]

fomite \Prononciation ?\ féminin

  1. Ablatif singulier de fōmes.