gall

Définition, traduction, prononciation, anagramme et synonyme sur le dictionnaire libre Wiktionnaire.
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Voir aussi : gäll, Gall

Anglais[modifier le wikicode]

Étymologie[modifier le wikicode]

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Nom commun [modifier le wikicode]

gall

  1. Bile, fiel, amertume.
    • It seemed that the bitterest thoughts of her life must have centred about the wooded reaches and the bright green meadows around Goring; but women strangely hug the knife that stabs them, and, perhaps, amidst the gall, there may have mingled also sunny memories of sweetest hours, spent upon those shadowed deeps over which the great trees bend their branches down so low. — (Jerome K. Jerome, Three Men in a Boat, XVI, 1889)

Verbe 1 [modifier le wikicode]

gall transitif

  1. (Transitif) Déranger, troubler, gêner.
    • I went below, and did what I could for my wound; it pained me a good deal, and still bled freely; but it was neither deep nor dangerous, nor did it greatly gall me when I used my arm. — (Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island, Part Five, chapitre 27, 1883)
    • Edward Churchill still attended to his work in a hopeless mechanical manner like a sleep-walker who walks safely on a well-known round. But his Roman collar galled him, his cossack stifled him, his biretta was as uncomfortable as a merry-andrew's cap and bells. — (W. B. Maxwell, The Mirror and the Lamp, chapitre 15, 1918)
  2. Harceler, souvent avec intention de causer un préjudice.
    • The disposition for these detachments is as follows – Morgans corps, to gain the enemy’s right flank; Maxwells brigade to hang on their left. Brigadier Genl. Scott is now marching with a very respectable detachment destined to gall the enemys left flank and rear. — (George Washington, The Writings of George Washington From the Original Manuscript Sources : Volume 12, 1745–1799, 24 juin 1778)
  3. Frotter, soumettre à la friction ; créer une lésion sur la peau.
    • …he went awkwardly in these clothes at first: wearing the drawers was very awkward to him, and the sleeves of the waistcoat galled his shoulders and the inside of his arms; but a little easing them where he complained they hurt him, and using himself to them, he took to them at length very well. — (Daniel Defoe, en:Robinson Crusoe, 1719)
  4. Exaspérer.
    • Metrinko was hungry, but he was galled by how self-congratulatory his captors seemed, how generous and noble and proudly Islamic. — (Mark Bowden, « Captivity Pageant », The Atlantic, volume 296, n° 5, pp. 92-97, décembre 1979)
  5. Se moquer de, railler.

Verbe 2[modifier le wikicode]

gall intransitif

  1. Imprégner de noix galle.

Breton[modifier le wikicode]

Étymologie[modifier le wikicode]

Du vieux breton gall (étranger, ennemi).

Adjectif [modifier le wikicode]

gall \ˈɡalː\

  1. Gallo, gallais.
  2. (Par extension) Français (étranger à la Basse-Bretagne).
  3. (Vieilli) Gaulois.
  4. (Figuré) Bègue

Synonymes[modifier le wikicode]

Dérivés[modifier le wikicode]

Forme de verbe [modifier le wikicode]

Mutation Forme
Non mutée gall
Adoucissante cʼhall
Semi-régulière cʼhall

gall \ˈɡalː\

  1. Troisième personne du singulier de l’indicatif présent du verbe gallout.

Variantes orthographiques[modifier le wikicode]

Catalan[modifier le wikicode]

Étymologie[modifier le wikicode]

Étymologie manquante ou incomplète. Si vous la connaissez, vous pouvez l’ajouter en cliquant ici.

Nom commun [modifier le wikicode]

Singulier Pluriel
gall
\Prononciation ?\
galls
\Prononciation ?\

gall masculin

  1. Poule.